Blog — Health

Health Care Reform and HIV/AIDS

Black people continue to bear the brunt of the AIDS epidemic; we are also being rocked by the economic recession. As Black families lose their homes, jobs, and health insurance, it is critical that a bigger and stronger safety-net be available. The health care reform legislation passed last year is a major step towards health-related security for all Black Americans especially those living with HIV/AIDS.


Health Care Reform and Essential Benefits

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) offers hope to millions of Americans who will gain insurance coverage under it; and the definition of essential benefits plays a crucial role in turning that hope into a useful reality. As Secretary Sebelius of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) said recently:


Black Men, Manhood and Mercy: Their thoughts on HIV and AIDS

In February 2011 I began a project asking 200 Black men “What comes to mind when you think about HIV and AIDS?” Ages 18 to 60, participants hailed from L.A., Baltimore, DC, Oakland, Detroit, Atlanta, New York, Miami and Chicago. None worked in the health field or HIV industry. Responses to the question varied, but not by much. A typical reply was “I think of homosexuality,” said one 30ish gentleman, waiting at Atlanta's Hartsfield airport for a flight to Dallas. “That’s mostly who has it. Right? That’s what I heard.” I then asked, “If that were true what would you do about it?” Suddenly, he was speechless. Conspicuously, I anticipated his reply. “What can I do about that?” he finally said. I asked, “Is that a real question, because you care, or was it rhetorical?” Appearing to second guess himself, he responded, “Man, I gotta catch my flight. It was cool talking with you. Peace.”


Black Men Who Don’t Have Sex with Men: “The Forgotten Population in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS”

As we enter into our thirtieth year of the HIV/AIDS pandemic here in America, I’m still hearing many researchers, men who have sex with men (MSM), HIV activists, the infected and the affected asking the same question; “Where are the heterosexual (non-MSM) Black men, and why aren’t they doing more to address the HIV/AIDS pandemic in the Black community?”


Silence Isn’t Golden:  A Call for Community Discussion about HIV/AIDS in Women

Let’s talk about sex. No, not the Salt ‘N’ Pepa hit from the 1990s. As a Black Community, especially black women, we need to have an honest discussion about what really happens behind our closed doors. Two weeks ago, I turned twenty-five. While I am thankful to have lived for quarter of a century, it is sobering to know that 83.8 percent of women in my age group (25-34) attributed contracting HIV through heterosexual contact in 2008. It is even more disconcerting to note that Black/African American women had the highest percentage (87 percent) of HIV transmission through heterosexual contact .These statistics are staggering. It is time to ring the alarm. Our silence here is not golden.


Raising Black Girls in the Age of HIV/AIDS:

In honor of the 30th commemoration of HIV/AIDS, the NAACP has launched a blogging campaigning entitled HIV/AIDS at 30. It will feature blogs and video posts from the NAACP staff, leadership, members, and partners on various topics that affect the black community. Each month we will have a new topic. March is Women and Girls month and two of our Act Against Aids Initiative (AAALI) partners, Black Women’s Health Imperative‘s President and CEO, Eleanor Hilton Hoytt and the National Council of Negro Women’s, Executive Director Dr. Avis Jones- DeWeever have written articles to shed light on a disease that is claiming the lives of so many black women.


Claiming Our Power in the Fight Against AIDS

I sat before the room dumbfounded. Surrounding me were brilliant, beautiful, driven, and successful young women. Each high achievers in their own right. Each on the verge of certain success. Yet, these young women who had originally come to my office to discuss transversing that critical, but sometimes scary path of transitioning from undergraduate education to the rest of their lives, had seemingly only one thing at the top of their minds, “Will I ever find love?”


Take the President’s Challenge Today

America is facing a crisis when it comes to leading healthy lifestyles. And of the populations suffering most from diet-related illness, African Americans top the list.


January 2011: Glaucoma Awareness Month

A silent disease is taking away the sight of millions of Americans. It’s called glaucoma and it can slowly reduce eyesight and may cause blindness.


“Reform vs. Repeal”

As we begin this new year, the NAACP finds ourselves back in the fight to support that which is now law: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.


Destroying the Stigma — World Aids Day 2010

As we commemorated World AIDS Day on December 1st HIV continues to be a relentless burden to the African American community.


World AIDS Day 2010: A Rekindling of Awareness

Today, December 1, 2010, is World Aids Day, a day of remembrance, awareness, and reverence. Across the nation there are exciting events taking place to commemorate today.


The NAACP’s Health Department is requesting proposal from our units for mini grants

The NAACP’s Health Department is requesting proposal from our units for mini grants (up to $1000 per 7 units) for World Aids Day on Dec 1, 2010.


Learn More about Medicare and the Affordable Care Act - Thursday, 11/4

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the NAACP invite you to join us on Thursday, November 4, 2010, for a webinar session to learn about Medicare and the Affordable Care Act.


Webinar- Help Uninsured Americans Gain Better Access to Prescription Medicines

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) invites you to participate in an informative webinar about ways in which you can help uninsured Americans gain better access to prescription medicines.


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