About the Criminal Justice Staff

Carlton T. Mayers, II, Esq., a native of New York City, serves as NAACP’s Criminal Justice Manager. He is also the Lead Researcher of the NAACP Born Suspect: Racial Profiling Report.  He received his B.S. in Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia and his J.D. and Master’s in Environmental Law and Policy from Vermont Law School in South Royalton, Vermont. Likewise, he has admission to the New Jersey State Bar.

Carlton’s professional experience includes serving as a Law Clerk with the City Attorney’s Office for the City of Burlington, Vermont where he worked with the city attorneys, the Mayor’s office, and city council members on various municipal law issues such as open meetings law and public records law. Subsequently, he performed legal duties on unemployment benefits, public assistance housing, and foreclosure relief cases with Vermont Legal Aid, Inc. In addition, he volunteered as a Community Panelist for the Chittenden County Restorative Justice Panel in Vermont where he and other panelists determined a fair, structured way to resolve juvenile crimes through balanced and restorative justice.

Carlton then moved to Maryland and served in AmeriCorps for 2 years as the Program Manager for the Reentry Mediation Program at the Conflict Resolution Center of Montgomery County. In this position, he helped incarcerated people who were about to re-enter society resolve conflicts in important relationships with people on the “outside” through mediation in order to provide them with a stable second chance and reduce recidivism. Since AmeriCorps, he serves as an active Volunteer in the Alternatives to Violence Project in Maryland, where he and other volunteers participate in activities and engage in discussions with incarcerants serving time in the Maryland Department of Corrections about violence and alternatives to violence. He is also an active Volunteer in the Maryland Alliance for Justice Reform, whose purpose is to establish and introduce reentry reform legislation within the Maryland State Legislature.