NAACP Mourns the Loss of A.M.E. Logan

NAACP Mourns the Loss of A.M.E. Logan

Jackson, MS NAACP icon remembered

(Jackson, MS) -- The NAACP mourns the passing of A.M.E. Logan, a pioneer of the NAACP’s work in Jackson, Mississippi during the civil rights era. She was 96.

Mrs. Logan was known as the “Mother of the Jackson Civil Rights Movement”. She moved to Jackson in the early 1940’s with her late husband, S.L. Logan. Since 1944 she lived in her home on Biloxi Street, which is currently in the process of being renamed by the Jackson City Council in honor of her memory.

“It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the passing of A.M.E. Logan,” stated NAACP Chairman Roslyn M. Brock. “When Mrs. Logan joined the NAACP Jackson branch she was the only woman in the room. Her tremendous work for the Jackson branch and NAACP Mississippi State Conference at a time of great danger and uncertainty should serve as an inspiration for all the men and women fighting for civil rights today.”

“A.M.E. Logan left a legacy that will not be forgotten,” stated NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous. “A great believer in progress and equality, she played an invaluable role in the civil rights movement in Mississippi. She will be remembered for her bravery and dedication to advancing human and civil rights for all.”

Mrs. Logan served as secretary of the NAACP’s Jackson branch as well as secretary of the NAACP Mississippi State Conference. She served in every capacity in the NAACP at least once, excluding treasurer. An accomplished saleswoman for Avon later in life, in the 1950’s she succeeded in revitalizing the NAACP Jackson branch through heavy door-to-door recruitment.

"Mrs. Logan’s life epitomizes the dedication and sacrifices of many loyal activists during the height of the civil rights era,” stated NAACP Chairman Emeritus Myrlie Evers-Williams. “She worked tirelessly on behalf of countless people whose lives were improved because of her vital contributions to the cause of social justice and community service. She leaves an indelible mark on Mississippi’s history, and an enduring legacy for youth activists to emulate. We remember her as one who cared.”

"Mrs. Logan was an activist and, despite her years, active until the very end,” stated Former Mississippi Supreme Court Justice and NAACP National Board Member Honorable Fred L. Banks Jr. “Over the past eight decades, one could hardly attend a meeting having to do with the struggle for equality and justice without noting her presence and hearing her voice. Her contributions are immeasurable and she will be missed."

Mrs. Logan remained deeply involved in the NAACP’s mission throughout the civil rights era. She worked closely with Medgar Evers and often hosted visiting civil rights leaders, including members of the Freedom Riders and Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In 1962, Mrs. Logan and her husband were among the group of parents who filed the first school desegregation lawsuit in Mississippi. They filed suit on behalf of their youngest son, Willis Logan, who at the time was serving as President of the Mississippi State Conference Youth Chapter.

Homegoing services for Mrs. Logan will be held on Saturday, Feb. 12 at 11:00 am CST, at Pearl Street A.M.E. Church, 2519 Robinson Street, Jackson MS 39209.

Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation's oldest and largest civil rights organization. Its members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities, conducting voter mobilization and monitoring equal opportunity in the public and private sectors.

 

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