NAACP Partners with Local Schools to Fight Obesity

Schools from Wards 7 and 8 participate in launch

(Washington, DC) - On Tuesday, September 27, the NAACP will launch its Childhood Obesity Advocacy Guide to fight childhood obesity in African American communities. NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous, along with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and experts in the health field, will join students from Hendley Elementary School and Davis Elementary School to promote healthy living.

WHAT:  Press conference announcing report of Childhood Obesity Advocacy Guide
WHO: NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous, NAACP Director of Health Programs Shavon Arline , President and Co-Founder of CommonHealth Action Natalie S. Burke

WHERE:   Thurgood Marshall Center
1816 12th St. NW, Washington DC, 20009

WHEN: Tuesday, September 27th
10:00 am – 11:00 am

Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation's oldest and largest civil rights organization. Its members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities, conducting voter mobilization and monitoring equal opportunity in the public and private sectors.

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