Public Education Forum
Dec. 14 9am – 5pm
Pittsburgh, PA

Public education is the foundation of our democracy; it has the promise and potential to be the great equalizer of opportunity for our children—no matter their race, sexual orientation, ZIP code, or citizenship status. Across the nation, public schools should be centers of the community, a place where people get to know their neighbors, where young people learn not just skills and knowledge but also about relationships, how to respect differences and how to become engaged citizens.

Whether it’s in blue cities or red states, we are seeing meaningful commitments to smaller class sizes, increased wraparound services for students, and more resources for our neighborhood public schools.

America’s future deserves a fresh new chapter on public education. The days of so-called quick fixes, privatization schemes and failed public school takeovers must be behind us. More than half of the nation’s children in public schools live in poverty—yet too many elected leaders have pursued the Betsy DeVos agenda to defund public schools in favor of giving tax breaks to the rich and corporations and funneling money to private school vouchers and for-profit charters that don’t help kids.

Public Education Forum 2020 is an opportunity to ensure that public education’s promise and potential are fulfilled. It’s time to give all our children the schools they deserve, regardless of demography or geography. America’s students deserve to attend fully funded public schools that are free from gun violence, reject zero-tolerance discipline, and don’t impose endless, overpriced standardized tests. Our educators deserve respect, dignity and meaningful support. And we all deserve to live in a society where education equity is a top priority, elected leaders stand up for children, and higher education is affordable.

Ninety percent of America’s children attend public schools. That’s why it’s so critical that we hear where the presidential candidates stand on fulfilling public education’s promise and potential. We’ll have that opportunity on Dec. 14, when a coalition of parents, educators, students and community members will host a public education forum in Pittsburgh to ask presidential candidates about their plans for our public schools.

Public education is the foundation of our democracy; it has the promise and potential to be the great equalizer of opportunity for our children—no matter their race, sexual orientation, ZIP code, or citizenship status. Across the nation, public schools should be centers of the community, a place where people get to know their neighbors, where young people learn not just skills and knowledge but also about relationships, how to respect differences and how to become engaged citizens.

Whether it’s in blue cities or red states, we are seeing meaningful commitments to smaller class sizes, increased wraparound services for students, and more resources for our neighborhood public schools.

America’s future deserves a fresh new chapter on public education. The days of so-called quick fixes, privatization schemes and failed public school takeovers must be behind us. More than half of the nation’s children in public schools live in poverty—yet too many elected leaders have pursued the Betsy DeVos agenda to defund public schools in favor of giving tax breaks to the rich and corporations and funneling money to private school vouchers and for-profit charters that don’t help kids.

Public Education Forum 2020 is an opportunity to ensure that public education’s promise and potential are fulfilled. It’s time to give all our children the schools they deserve, regardless of demography or geography. America’s students deserve to attend fully funded public schools that are free from gun violence, reject zero-tolerance discipline, and don’t impose endless, overpriced standardized tests. Our educators deserve respect, dignity and meaningful support. And we all deserve to live in a society where education equity is a top priority, elected leaders stand up for children, and higher education is affordable.

Ninety percent of America’s children attend public schools. That’s why it’s so critical that we hear where the presidential candidates stand on fulfilling public education’s promise and potential. We’ll have that opportunity on Dec. 14, when a coalition of parents, educators, students and community members will host a public education forum in Pittsburgh to ask presidential candidates about their plans for our public schools.